Welcome to Volume 1: For My Culture

If you’ve been tuning into recent news and social media, you would know that the United States, and the world, is in a state of change. It started with COVID-19 changing how we socialize and go out, and now, with the murder of George Floyd, we can hopefully change how we think and live.

Angela Davis once stated that, “We’ve got to talk about liberating minds as well as liberating society.” For years- no- for centuries, there has been a constant battle for liberation. Liberation of female bodies, liberation of Black bodies, Indigenous bodies, and more. Liberation of our bodies, minds, and souls. With the recent events surrounding Breonna Taylor, George Floyd, the many other Black victims of police brutality, and the subsequent protests, there is a stark reminder/realization/reiteration, whatever you wanna call it, that there is a long road to liberation for Black people in America and around the world.

Slaves in the U.S. were emancipated with the 13th Amendment passed in 1865. Afterwards, institutional laws and interference went on to find any possible way they could continue the mental and bodily containment and enslavement of Black people. From prisons, to increased police force, defunding of education and social programs, and catchy pseudonyms like “The War on Drugs,” Black people have been vilified and forgotten throughout history and modern-day America.

That is why people are upset. That is why we protest and speak out. These most recent acts of police brutality were just the breaking point of an already fragile structural imbalance. Like Ms. Davis said, the minds of the people must be liberated. We must continue to be educated and motivated, and we must use that knowledge and power to liberate our society. This is not just a fight for Black people, but for all of those suffocated under the heavy hand of White supremacy.


This understanding is something that I have had to live with for most of my adulthood, and even before that, I have always felt the weights of the world’s- and my people’s- struggles invading my childhood and shaping my current mindset. I’ve always pondered on how I could make a difference; how I could bring about educating and inspiring others- even if it’s just my sphere of influence? What can one person do?

I’ve shaped my entire life around working towards that liberation, in any way that I can. I’ve worked hard on educating myself and learning more every day. I actually love learning, so that wasn’t so hard. I’ve worked hard on my faith and walking through life with love in my heart. I’ve chosen a career path that would allow me to educate the future generations because to me education is invaluable, and too often minorities are poor communities are led to be believe that help and education is a privilege when it is NOT. This is where I found my passion and purpose in life. And I’ve taken this passion and worked it into my writing- trying to educate others through film writing because art and media are not just expression, but another form of education, as well.

So I want to take it a step further… I want to take my website and use it to further amplify mine and the voices of my people. I love to educate and learn, but I also love my culture. Going forward, I will be doing a quarterly issue/theme on my blog that centers around loving my culture and others loving their own. This theme will be for amplifying Black voices, but in the future, I hope that I can help amplify the voices of so many more. I hope you guys enjoy!

Thank you, xoxo

**If you would like to write about your own favorite film, favorite music/artist, favorite work of art, etc. that has inspired or educated you, or if you would just like to talk about your experience as a Black woman/man/nonbinary person in America, please reach out to me. I would be more than happy to have your voice and story on here!**

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