Category: Reviews

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Miss Juneteenth (2020) Feels like Home

She lays a pillow on the floor in front of the couch. She sits you down on the floor before her and gets right to work with the hair box, grease, gel, comb and brush next to her. Looking back, having my hair done by my mom was one of our most intimate moments. I’ve gotten in trouble for not holding my head straight more times than I can count. I can still remember holding the floor for dear life as she combed through my knots. I remember falling asleep on her lap and waking up feeling like my face had been pulled tight, back into my hair. I didn’t know it then, but my mom was giving me all of her love in those moments. She wanted me to look nice. She would admire me afterwards, like she knew she was succeeding at something. Looking back, I feel nothing but love for those moments.

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Mental Health Awareness Month: Inside Out (2015)

Inside Out (2015) Carries a Message That Spans Generations

May 31 marked the end of this year’s Mental Health Awareness Month, but that doesn’t mean the conversation should end. Mental health effects all of us, positively and negatively, so it shouldn’t be the taboo conversation that it is. It’s important that we talk about our bad days. It’s important that we mourn. It’s important that we cry. It’s important to feel, to reach out, to talk it out…

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A Goofy Movie, and A 25 Year Anniversary

This childhood classic tells you to Embrace Your ‘Goof’

25 years ago, Disney’s underrated gem, A Goofy Movie (1995), was released. Most of us grew up watching this classic animated film, including myself, but it wasn’t until adulthood that I could appreciate and understand it for all it truly has to offer. From the tender story-line between a father and son, to the themes of self-acceptance, Powerline’s “Stand Out” and “I2I” bops, and finally to the overall Blackness that the film exudes- A Goofy Movie is a critical film in Disney’s Renaissance era repertoire.

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The Story of a World that Lost its Wonder, and the Brother’s Who Rediscovered It- Onward (2020)

Once upon a time...

…the world was full of wonder. The magic of the world was a spectacle to be explored and expanded, but the complexities of magic were replaced with the simplicities of invention and convenience. Thus, the magic dwindled, and the world changed forever.

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Reinvention Through a Modern Lens: The Invisible Man (2020)

We are living through an age of re-invention. Whether it is through fashion trends, slang, or in the case of The Invisible Man (2020), horror films. Re-invention is more than just re-adaptation or a reboot. A Nightmare on Elm Street (2010) was a reboot of the eponymous 1984 film. However, The Invisible Man is the re-invention of its 1933 predecessor.

Instead of re-telling the old story of Griffin- a maniacal scientist who turns himself invisible- this is the story of Cecilia “Cee” Kass (Elizabeth Moss) on the run from her sociopathic, abusive boyfriend, Adrian Griffin (Oliver Jackson-Cohen.) Adrian is an optics scientist who has gained indispensable wealth through his inventions. One invention in particular, however, he has kept to himself, and it is a suit covered in cameras that renders it’s host invisible. So after Cecilia’s prison break from Adrian’s physical grasp at the beginning of the film, he fakes his own suicide and uses his invisible suit to continue his abuse towards Cecilia in a more sinister and horrific way.

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Atlantics (2019) is a Coming-of-Age and an Ethereal Love Story

Atlantics (2019) was first released at the 2019 Cannes Film Festival when it competed for the Palme d’Or. The films director and co-writer, Mati Diop, made history when she became the first black woman who directed a film featured in the competition- also winning the Grand Prix award for it. After its release at Cannes and later in Senegal, the film was picked up and released on Netflix for wide viewing.

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Sexuality is not Just a Positivity, but It is a Necessity- Jezebel (2019)

ARRAY is the new voice of film artists of color and female filmmakers worldwide. Founded by Ava DuVernay, the independent film distribution company places focus on black stories and female voices, with it’s most recent release, Jezebel, being a manifestation of both.

Jezebel (2019) is a semi-autobiographical, coming-of-age film written and directed by Numa Perrier. The story follows 19 year old Tiffany (Tenille) through the struggles of growing up and losing her mother, while she also finds work as a cam-girl.

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Little Women (2019) is the Spark That Lights the Fire of a Writer’s Motivation

This is it. This is the feeling I wish I could leave with every time I watch a new movie in theaters. I guess that wouldn’t make the feeling so special then, huh? So, I’ll just hold on to this for as long as I can. Watching Little Women (2019) yesterday in a packed theater while I get over this annoying cold was a moving experience with an epiphanic ending.

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How ‘Marriage Story’ (2019) Portrays One of the Greatest Criminal Acts Committed in a Marriage

Marriage Story  (2019) is the brand new Noah Baumbach film released on Netflix this month. The film and its stars have been nominated for numerous upcoming awards, and its clips are being shared and discussed all over the tweeter every day. Whether you’ve liked the film or even seen it, you’ve at least heard of it and its explosive scene between the two main characters- Nicole (Scarlett Johansson) and Charlie (Adam Driver.)

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Honey Boy (2019) is a Healing Process

“Make me look good, honey boy.”
That’s what James says to his son, Otis, at the end of the film, when he tells him he’ll be writing a movie about him. “Honey boy” is a term of endearment for Otis from his father, and it’s also the title of this film.

Honey Boy (2019) is the autobiographical screenplay written by Shia LaBeouf and directed by Alma Har’el. It’s the story of a young boy named Otis (played by Noah Jupe) as he finds himself in the spotlight of the acting world while also dealing with the turmoil and abusive relationship with his father James (played by LaBeouf himself.)