Tag: Reviews

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Miss Juneteenth (2020) Feels like Home

She lays a pillow on the floor in front of the couch. She sits you down on the floor before her and gets right to work with the hair box, grease, gel, comb and brush next to her. Looking back, having my hair done by my mom was one of our most intimate moments. I’ve gotten in trouble for not holding my head straight more times than I can count. I can still remember holding the floor for dear life as she combed through my knots. I remember falling asleep on her lap and waking up feeling like my face had been pulled tight, back into my hair. I didn’t know it then, but my mom was giving me all of her love in those moments. She wanted me to look nice. She would admire me afterwards, like she knew she was succeeding at something. Looking back, I feel nothing but love for those moments.

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Atlantics (2019) is a Coming-of-Age and an Ethereal Love Story

Atlantics (2019) was first released at the 2019 Cannes Film Festival when it competed for the Palme d’Or. The films director and co-writer, Mati Diop, made history when she became the first black woman who directed a film featured in the competition- also winning the Grand Prix award for it. After its release at Cannes and later in Senegal, the film was picked up and released on Netflix for wide viewing.

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Sexuality is not Just a Positivity, but It is a Necessity- Jezebel (2019)

ARRAY is the new voice of film artists of color and female filmmakers worldwide. Founded by Ava DuVernay, the independent film distribution company places focus on black stories and female voices, with it’s most recent release, Jezebel, being a manifestation of both.

Jezebel (2019) is a semi-autobiographical, coming-of-age film written and directed by Numa Perrier. The story follows 19 year old Tiffany (Tenille) through the struggles of growing up and losing her mother, while she also finds work as a cam-girl.

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Little Women (2019) is the Spark That Lights the Fire of a Writer’s Motivation

This is it. This is the feeling I wish I could leave with every time I watch a new movie in theaters. I guess that wouldn’t make the feeling so special then, huh? So, I’ll just hold on to this for as long as I can. Watching Little Women (2019) yesterday in a packed theater while I get over this annoying cold was a moving experience with an epiphanic ending.

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Honey Boy (2019) is a Healing Process

“Make me look good, honey boy.”
That’s what James says to his son, Otis, at the end of the film, when he tells him he’ll be writing a movie about him. “Honey boy” is a term of endearment for Otis from his father, and it’s also the title of this film.

Honey Boy (2019) is the autobiographical screenplay written by Shia LaBeouf and directed by Alma Har’el. It’s the story of a young boy named Otis (played by Noah Jupe) as he finds himself in the spotlight of the acting world while also dealing with the turmoil and abusive relationship with his father James (played by LaBeouf himself.)

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‘The Witcher’ is a Fantasy World with a lot of Kick-ass Women

“I bow to no law made by men who never bore a child.”- Queen Calanthe (The Witcher-2019)

Netflix’s new show, The Witcher, based on a slew of books, stories, video games, and more content of the same name, premiered just at the end of 2019 and really ended the streaming services year of shows and original films with a ‘bang.’ In the new series, we watch as states literally rise and others fall at the hands of those risen states, and we watch as Mages helm the opposing sides into victory. The Witcher is much like many fantasy shows of it’s kind, with witches and kings and queens galore, but what I believe this show began, and what I hope it will continue to do, is tell in-depth stories about the characters of its show and also offer ample opportunities for people, especially women, of color.

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You Can Push Numbers, but You Can’t Push People- Uncut Gems (2020)

**The following review contains spoilers for the film**

Howard Ratner is a Jewish man with a large, unified family, a beautiful wife, three loving children, and a renowned jewelry shop that he owns on the diamond district in New York City. Howard also has a hot girlfriend, a gambling addiction, and over $100,000 in debt to multiple people across the state of New York. Such a versatile man, with a dirty, mixed cocktail of a life leaving him intoxicated and fucked over with every sip he takes.

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Happy Valentine’s Day: Taking a Look at “My Bloody Valentine” (1981) 29 Years Later

Happy Valentine’s Day to my lovers, my friends, my in-betweeners, and my single party people!
What’s better than spending $100+ on a date night out? If you’re like me, then staying in and watching some good movies is always better. Right now, streaming services have a slew of romantic films for you to cuddle up to and revel in the bliss of Hollywood-curated love. Netflix has gems like Obvious Child (2014), The Notebook (2004), and Her (2013). You can cry along to If Beale Street Could Talk (2018) or binge 90 Day Fiance on HULU. Or you can get a little wild and watch The Big Sick (2017) and Bridget Jones’ Diary (2001) on Amazon Prime. No matter what streaming service you choose, love is in the air.

HOWEVER, if you’re a gal like me, there’s nothing like snuggling up with a good horror movie for any day of the year. Horror films are the epitome of comfort to me, so I have special one’s I watch for every holiday. Krampus (2015) and Black Christmas (1974/2019) on Christmas, Jaws (1975) on the Fourth of July, and My Bloody Valentine (1981) for Valentine’s Day (watch for free on Crackle)!